Recently, we’ve seen an increase in the number of high CPU/High Memory usage problems with WSUS, including WSUS in a System Center Configuration Manager environment – these have mostly corresponded with Update Tuesdays.

Source : Ask the Core Team
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Source : motor1

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In IIS 10.0, we introduced the IISAdministration PowerShell module which was a new way to manage IIS. This module included numerous improvements over the existing WebAdministration cmdlets
Unfortunately, folks who hadn’t updated to Windows Server 2016 weren’t able to take advantage of the new management cmdlets until now. I’m pleased to announce that we’ve now released this module to the PowerShell Gallery and is available for use on Windows Server 2012 and above.

Source : IIS Team Blog
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If you still rely on PowerShell 2.0, you should think about updating your code to work with PowerShell 5.0. Starting in the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, Microsoft will no longer support PowerShell 2.0. In this Ask the Admin, I’ll discuss why PowerShell 2.0 poses a security risk and how to remove it from Windows 10.

Source : Petri
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In the wake of Adobe’s announcement about the end of life of Flash, Microsoft this week announced its own schedule for removing Flash from its own products.

Source : Thurrott.com
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If you notice that your WordPress hosting provider is not running PHP 7, but has it available to its users, you may want to consider making a WordPress PHP version change so you can benefit from all of PHP 7’s features. However, in order to avoid breaking your site, you should make sure all of your site’s themes and plugins are compatible. 
To check for WordPress PHP version compatibility, you can use another simple plugin called PHP Compatibility Checker.

Source : wpbuffs.com
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The WordPress core uses .htaccess for two things: Permalinks and Multisite. This means that .htaccess is only required if you have enabled either of these features. Otherwise, .htaccess is entirely optional for default WordPress installations. Beyond the WP core, many plugins also use the .htaccess file for custom directives involving rewrites, redirects, custom headers, file compression, and much more. In many cases, such plugins add their .htaccess rules to your .htaccess file automatically, behind the scenes. 
So even if you haven’t enabled Permalinks or Multisite, your site may be using .htaccess rules added by WordPress plugins for various types of functionality. That’s one of the cool things about .htaccess: it can be configured and customized to improve your site’s performance, security, and usability. To help you get started, this tutorial provides a collection of .htaccess techniques that are useful for any WordPress-powered site. Combined into a blank .htaccess file, these techniques serve as a great starting point for creating your own custom .htaccess file for WordPress.

Source : Perishable Press
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