Tuesday, February 28, 2012

What we know about the 2013 Volkswagen Golf, next-gen GTI

The next GTI will be an order of magnitude better, bringing it back in line with the original hot hatch.

Lighter, faster, stronger, better. That's what we can expect from the seventh-generation Volkswagen Golf, due to be unveiled at the 2012 Paris Motor Show before it hits dealerships across Europe this fall and eventually lands on U.S. shores as a 2013 model.

So what makes it special? A combination of new manufacturing processes, an all-new platform, a range of upgraded engines and what will go down as one of the greatest democratizations of active safety and in-car technology in automotive history.

What's more, the next GTI will be an order of magnitude better because of it, bringing it back in line with the original hot hatch while packed with even more standard features.

...the turbocharged 2.0-liter – making use of Audi's Valvelift system – will max-out at 280 hp. But fear not, your front tires are safe. Sorta. The GTI variant is likely to be limited to around 230-240 hp, but torque will be up to nearly 260 pound-feet.

Source : Autoblog

Monday, February 13, 2012

Daemon Tools is cataloging all your disc images, without permission

So after launching Daemon Tools Lite today, I noticed a new pane on the right labeled MountSpace. Turns out, it’s a cute little service that shows the top games and applications that folks are mounting and using in Daemon Tools. And to deliver that experience, Daemon Tools hashes every image you mount and sends it to MountSpace servers with or without permission. Combined with your IP address, and probably more, it doesn’t take a genius to realize this is a huge privacy issue.

Source : Within Windows

Thursday, February 09, 2012

Chrome 17

Yesterday Google released Chrome 17. Read the What’s new in Chrome 17 from George B. Moga

Windows 8 Consumer Preview due February 29: why it's not called beta

The Windows 8 Consumer Preview will be available for download on February 29. Why isn’t it called a beta? Blame Google. And Apple. And Microsoft. Especially Microsoft.

Source : Ed Bott's Microsoft Report

Tuesday, February 07, 2012

SysPrep /generalize + BCD store + STOP: c000021a

Today I tried to do a sysprep of a Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 computer before capturing an image of it via imagex.

sysprep.exe /generalize /oobe /shutdown /unattend:unattend.xml

Everything went fine and the computer shutdown.

Then I rebooted the server and had a blue screen (BSOD) :

STOP: c000021a {Fatal System Error}
The session manager initialization system process terminated unexpectedly with a status of 0xc000003a (0x00000000 0x00000000).
The system has been shut down.

I found out that SYSPREP had made some changes to my Boot Configuration Data (BCD). Here’s an extract of my setupact.log file :

LaunchDll:Found 'C:\Windows\System32\spbcd.dll,Sysprep_Generalize_Bcd'; executing it
Sysprep_Generalize_Bcd: Located BCD store on system drive. Generalizing it...
GeneralizeBcdStore: Found the memory tester object.
GeneralizeBcdStore: Found the Windows OS Loader object {bb3f7e5d-3afe-11e1-908d-0010184c4562} for the currently running OS.
GeneralizeBcdStore: Found the resume object {bb3f7e5c-3afe-11e1-908d-0010184c4562} for the OS loader.
GeneralizeBcdStore: System drive backed by VHD = 0
GeneralizeBcdStore: Generalizing object {9dea862c-5cdd-4e70-acc1-f32b344d4795}
GeneralizeBcdStore: Successfully generalized application device. Status = [0x0]
GeneralizeBcdStore: Generalizing object {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d}
GeneralizeBcdStore: Successfully generalized application device. Status = [0x0]
GeneralizeBcdStore: Generalizing object {bb3f7e5d-3afe-11e1-908d-0010184c4562}
GeneralizeBcdStore: Successfully generalized application device. Status = [0x0]
GeneralizeBcdStore: Successfully generalized OS device. Status = [0x0]
GeneralizeBcdStore: Generalizing object {bb3f7e5c-3afe-11e1-908d-0010184c4562}
GeneralizeBcdStore: Successfully generalized application device. Status = [0x0]
GeneralizeBcdStore: Successfully generalized hiberfile device. Status = [0x0]
Sysprep_Generalize_Bcd: Successfully generalized the bcd store. Status=[0x0]
LaunchDll:Successfully executed 'C:\Windows\System32\spbcd.dll,Sysprep_Generalize_Bcd' without error

So, after running sysprep /generalize my BCD looked like this :

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {default}
device                  locate=\windows\system32\winload.efi
path                    \windows\system32\winload.efi
description             Windows Server 2008 R2
locale                  en-us
inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
osdevice                locate=\windows
systemroot              \windows
resumeobject            {bb3f7e5c-3afe-11e1-908d-0010184c4562}
nx                      OptOut
detecthal               Yes

Did you noticed the locate=… value for the device and osdevice entries ? Well it seems that those new values were causing my blue screen.

I restored the previous values (before Sysprep) with the following commands :

bcdedit /set {default} device partition=C:
bcdedit /set [default} osdevice partition=C:

After that, my computer was able to boot again.

I’m not sure, but i suspect that this little mixed up with the BCD Store maybe related to how I partitioned my disk :

WinPE
Size 900Mb, boot WinPE to capture or apply an image from imagex
ESP
Size 100Mb, EFI System Partition, Active Partition
Microsoft Reserved
Size 128Mb
Windows
Size 120Gb, C: drive
Data
Size 400Gb, E: drive

My disk is initialize as a GPT disk and this is an EFI Computer.

My recommendation

Always make a backup of the BCD store before running SYSPREP :

bcdedit /export backupbcd.bcd

Monday, February 06, 2012

Flush IIS HTTP and FTP Logs to Disk

Today I wanted to find a way to flush the IIS FTP logs on-demand.  The logs for IIS FTP flush to disk every 6 minutes, and the HTTP logs every 1 minute (or 64kb).  This can make troubleshooting difficult when you don’t receive immediate access Read More......(read more)

Source : The Official Microsoft IIS Site

More MegaUpload Fallout As BitTorrent Search Engine BTjunkie Calls It Quits | TechCrunch

More MegaUpload Fallout As BitTorrent Search Engine BTjunkie Calls It Quits | TechCrunch

Thursday, February 02, 2012

The WMI Diagnosis Utility -- Version 2.1

A utility to help system administrators diagnose and repair problems with the WMI service.

Source : Microsoft Download Center

Web Sites and a Plug-in Free Web (IE10 & Metro)

The transition to a plug-in free Web is happening today. Any site that uses plug-ins needs to understand what their customers experience when browsing plug-in free. Lots of Web browsing today happens on devices that simply don’t support plug-ins. Even browsers that do support plug-ins offer many ways to run plug-in free.

Metro style IE runs plug-in free to improve battery life as well as security, reliability, and privacy for consumers. Previously, we wrote about how we use IE’s Compatibility View List to make sure sites that have a plug-in free experience for other browsers provide that same experience to IE10 users. This post describes a way for sites that continue to rely on plug-ins to provide consumers browsing with Metro style IE the best possible experience.

Developers with sites that need plug-ins can use an HTTP header or meta tag to signal Metro style Internet Explorer to prompt the user.

Source : IEBlog

Wednesday, February 01, 2012

IE10 Compat Inspector

Compat Inspector is now available for IE10. Use Compat Inspector to quickly identify if Internet Explorer platform changes affect your site. Whether you're preparing for IE10 or still updating for IE9, run Compat Inspector on any page experiencing problems. Then watch for messages explaining potential issues and steps you can take to resolve them.
Source : IE10 Compat Inspector - IEBlog

FireFox 10 is here

https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/10.0/releasenotes/